What is your favorite fly-in or airshow?

69 Props - 2011 Memphis Airshow

The March print issues of General Aviation News will focus on airshows and fly-ins, so we’re asking our readers about their favorites. Is there a show or fly-in you look forward to every year? What makes it special? Any tips for those who want to join in the fun about flying into the field or what to look forward to once at the fly-in? And don’t forget to send us your favorite fly-in photos! We’ll run some in print, as well as online. Send the photos and comments to janice@generalaviationnews.com or reply below in the Comments.

Harrison Ford injured in crash

HarrisonFordHarrison Ford was “battered but OK” Thursday after his Ryan PT-22 lost engine power and crash-landed on a California golf course, according to a report at NBCNews.com.

The 72-year-old actor, who was conscious and breathing when rescue crews reached him, was stabilized and taken to a hospital, where he was in fair to moderate condition, authorities said. Sources familiar with the incident told NBC News that Ford slammed into the plane’s console and control stick and that he underwent surgery Thursday night. He suffered a broken arm and a nasty gash to his head, among other injuries, they said.

Nosewheel failure for Cessna

The student pilot was practicing touch and goes in a Cessna 152 in College Station, Texas. The first two were normal. During the third landing, the airplane touched down on the main landing gear, and, as the pilot brought the nose down, the nosewheel collapsed. [Read more…]

One engine, many questions

172Skyhawk

Q: I have a Cessna 172N with the Lycoming O-320-H2AD 76 series engine, serial number L-3406-76. I’m trying to sell it, and I’m getting all kinds of questions regarding the “A” suffix, the “T” mod, and others that are way too far out there to even mention. [Read more…]

Radar class slated for Twin Commander University

Erik Eliel, Radar Training International

Among the often confusing displays, buttons, switches and annunciators in today’s advanced cockpits, one of the easiest devices to use is the airborne weather radar system. Simply turn it on, and when it’s warmed up and tested, adjust the range and tilt to see the weather ahead. What could be more intuitive?

In fact, there is plenty to know about what radar can do, how it does it, and — most importantly — its limitations. The problem is, formal instruction in the use of airborne weather radar has been difficult to find. That is a void Erik Eliel is on a mission to fill. [Read more…]