Calling all backcountry pilots

It’s time again for our special focus on backcountry flying in the print issues of General Aviation News. We’re reaching out to backcountry pilots with a call for memories of your most memorable or notable backcountry flight. What makes it so noteworthy? Where was it? Who was with you?

If you are a backcountry pilot, do you have any advice for readers who haven’t yet ventured off the airport? What’s the important lesson you’ve learned from your adventures? Where is a great place for a novice backcountry pilot to begin? What do you wish you had known before beginning your backcountry flying?

Add your comments below or send them to janice@generalaviationnews.com. Also, send your photos from your backcountry adventures and you may see them published in the July 20 issue.

Thanks!

 

FlightSimCon attracts crowds

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FlightSimCon 2015, the third annual flight simulation and aviation conference, was held June 13-14 at the New England Air Museum at Bradley International Airport, near Hartford, Connecticut.

With 320 attendees, 19 exhibitors, 31 sponsors, and 16 speakers, FlightSimCon 2015 was the largest flight simulation-focused event in North America in the past several years, according to organizers. [Read more…]

Failure to abort takeoff kills pilot

The 16,900-hour ATP, 69, who was type rated in a Sikorsky SK-76 helicopter, Beech BE-300 and Fairchild Swearingen SA-227 airplanes, was flying a Cricket MC12, a twin-engine experimental design, that was estimated to be at least 30 pounds above the design gross weight of 375 pounds, but 15 pounds under the builder-designated gross weight at the time of the accident.

Because the airplane was an experimental amateur built airplane, the builder can waiver from the design criteria, including gross weight. According to FAA records, the pilot purchased the plane on Dec. 6, 2002. No maintenance records were located. [Read more…]

Batten down the hatches

FloatingDog

Once I began flying the line, I rarely thought about seat positions and calibrations. At a certain point, takeoffs and landings in an airliner are all about holding a particular deck angle. That generally means eyes more inside on the artificial horizon than outside. Plus the time pressures we were under to run our checklists, procedures and flows and get out of the gate on time pushed seat adjustments down the priority list.

Anyway, I rarely put anything up on the glare shield. And if I did, I’d see it, right? [Read more…]