Cessna’s Citation M2 makes first flight

Cessna’s new Citation M2 made its first prototype flight March 9. The flight lasted a little more than an hour and a half and included tests of the avionics system, autopilot, engine system, aircraft systems and instrument approaches.

The prototype took off and landed at Wichita, Kan., Mid-Continent Airport (ICT) where Cessna’s main manufacturing facility is located.

“I am excited to say the aircraft performance, handling characteristics and Garmin G3000 avionics were exceptional, just as we had anticipated,” said Peter Fisher, Cessna’s engineering test pilot who flew the Citation M2. “With this essential program milestone complete, we are looking forward to a successful flight test program and FAA certification so our customers can soon enjoy this great aircraft.”

The Citation M2 is a new light business jet that fills the gap between the Citation Mustang and the Citation CJ family, company officials said. FAA certification (Part 23) is expected in the first half of 2013, followed by deliveries beginning in the second half of 2013.

Scott Ernest, Cessna president and CEO, congratulates Pete Fisher after a successful first flight of the Citation M2 prototype.

“The Citation M2 development team is focused on bringing this program to maturity, and their dedication is reflected in the speed in which the program is moving forward,” said Brian Rohloff, Cessna’s Citation Mustang and M2 business leader. “Bringing this sleek airplane to market, so quickly, strongly positions Cessna in the marketplace and allows our customers to take advantage of its capabilities sooner.”

The Citation M2’s clean cockpit design is anchored by the fully integrated Garmin G3000 avionics suite and the aircraft is powered by a pair of FADEC-controlled Williams International FJ44-1AP-21 turbofan engines.

With room for two crew and up to six passengers, the $4.195 million M2 has a maximum cruise speed of 400 knots true airspeed and a range of 1,300 nautical miles. The aircraft can operate at airports with runways as short as 3,250 feet and will climb to 41,000 feet in 24 minutes, company officials said.

For more information: Cessna.com

 

 

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Comments

  1. Kevin Krywko says

    While it looks to be a good airplane, It’s still a CJ (Citation Jet); not that there’s anything wrong with that, but Cessna needs to call it what it is for it is not a clean sheet design.

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