Dynon employees building Glasair Sportsman

ARLINGTON, Wash. — Since there are quite a few pilots among the 60 employees of Dynon Avionics, it seemed natural that seven of them would come together to create a flying club. Calling themselves the “Swamp Creek Flyers,” they pooled their resources and purchased a Sportsman aircraft kit, which they will assemble through Glasair’s Two Weeks To Taxi program.

Dynon Build (2)

Robert Hamilton (left) and Kevin Engle working on the wing.

“The primary reason for selecting the Sportsman is proximity,” said Robert Hamilton, president of Dynon and a founding member of the flying club. “Since the Glasair factory is only 20 miles away, it meant that a number of our employees could participate in the building program. Ian Jordon, our Chief Systems Engineer, is there for the entire two weeks, but he’ll be assisted by 14 other Dynon employees who are taking vacation time to learn something about aircraft construction.”

Once the aircraft is completed, it will be based at Paine Field in Everett, Washington. It will, of course, have an IFR panel that is completely made up of Dynon products. Since it is an Experimental, it will likely be used for field-testing future Dynon products and software.

Encho Tamnev (left), Robert Hamilton and Ian Jordon on the first day of their Sportsman construction project.

Encho Tamnev (left), Robert Hamilton and Ian Jordon on the first day of their Sportsman construction project.

The Glasair Sportsman is a four-seat, high-wing aircraft made of composite and aluminum materials. Following the two weeks it takes to build the aircraft, the Sportsman will be taken outside, run up and taxied. It usually takes another week to complete the paperwork, inspection and preparations for the first flight. Ian Jordon’s father, Mel Jordan, will be the test pilot for the project.

For more information: GlasairAviation.com or DynonAvionics.com

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