AOPA launches new finance company

The Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA) has launched a new aviation finance company that will give AOPA members greater access to lending options for aircraft purchases and avionics upgrades, according to officials.

The new service, AOPA Aviation Finance Company (AAF), will offer more flexible financing options through a collection of banks, rather than with just one institution. This will allow AAF to identify the best loan options for members and ultimately deliver competitive terms for each aviation transaction, AOPA officials say. AAF will not be loaning money directly, but instead be acting as a broker.

Notably, AAF will also help members obtain loans for aircraft that tend to be more difficult to finance, such as older, less-complex airplanes. AAF will also identify member loans for avionics upgrades.

“AAF is making flying more affordable and accessible by improving the aircraft financing process for our members,” said Craig Fuller, AOPA president and CEO. “This new program will help make buying a new airplane more enjoyable and friendlier.”

While AOPA has offered aircraft finance services for nearly two decades, the new AAF arrangement using multiple banking partners identifies financing options for all types of aircraft at competitive rates and terms. It also offers members exceptional service and knowledgeable advice regarding aircraft loans.

AAF staff will support each AOPA member as a broker, walking them step-by-step through the financing transaction. AAF will also provide faster time-to-ownership for members by providing quick decisions from established financing partners.

“Using a wide variety of banks gives AAF greater flexibility in arranging affordable financing and re-financing for AOPA members,” said AAF’s Adam Meredith, who oversees the program. “This is generating a lot of new added value for AOPA members.”

For more information: AOPAFinance.com or 800-62-PLANE.

Comments

  1. Aaron Dabney says:

    Maybe the proceeds from the AOPA Wine Club are funding this venture? Seriously, though, when AOPA launches internal products which directly compete with products already offered by others in the industry it’s supposed to advocate for, what is it really advocating?

  2. Now AOPA is a financial broker? Earning a fee for “helping” members? After 50 years membership that’s it for me. Instead of selling financial products, insurance, health exams and whatever else, why not go back to being an advocate for general aviation ONLY?

    Pete Schoeninger
    Wisconsin

  3. “Sorry Vern, your FICO score might get you the “pre-owned” 1946 Cessna 120, BUT, if you can get a co-maker, I have this nice “original” Beech D-18 for only $199/month for 360 months and “0%” interest; course, it’s been out of annual for 58 years but I can recommend a good shop! You don’t have a multi-engine rating; no problem – we’ll throw that in the deal”!

    • Hey Rod, the 120 would be much cheaper to run, but 58 years isn’t too bad for a Twin Beech! It is just fun to see the girls mentioned by people still, I had a lot of time wrenching on C-45′s and Super 18′s, mainly “E”&”G” models. Great strong airplanes we worked them hard with freight and they almost always made 1600 hrs on the engines (H&S props). The only airframe issues were from prior improper maintenance and the fork-lifts of course.

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