A conversation with the next generation of pilots

GlobalAir.com’s Ray Robinson Speaks with three student pilots

The Kentucky Institute for Aerospace Education (KIAE) is a one-of-a-kind endeavor, currently working with 14 high schools in the state to provide students direct experiences in aeronautical engineering, flight, aircraft maintenance, and space systems. When I asked Tim Smith, director of Frankfort High School’s Aviation program and CIO for KIAE, why this was important, he said, “Programs like these will lead to more students enrolling in post-secondary opportunities in flight/aeronautics, aircraft maintenance, aeronautical engineering, space systems engineering, aerospace computer engineering, air traffic control, and aviation management/operations. Another important element of expansion is that potential grant opportunities and other sponsorships examine viability and scale of the initiative. So, it is important to show its implementation in a variety of environments. In short, the more students that are studying aerospace, the more that will enter the workforce.”

Three of their students got to experience a different end of the spectrum when they rode along with a gathering of Yakolevs at Bowman Field in Louisville, Ky., just outside GlobalAir.com’s office. See more on the gathering here.

I spent a few minutes with Michael Dahl, Jason Smith and Seth Padgett (pictured above) just before they climbed into their respective cockpits for a bit of formation flying.

GlobalAir: What inspired each your interests in aviation?

Michael Dahl: My uncle took me flying in an open-air cockpit biplane right here at Bowman Field when I was 11 years old, and that summer I flew on a commercial airliner on our vacation to California — all that exposure to flying in a short amount of time got my attention. When I found there was an aviation-related program at Frankfort High School, I made sure to get involved!

Michael Dahl

Michael Dahl

Jason Smith: My mother often took me to the airport as a baby to let the sounds of aircraft calm me, so I’ve been interested a long time! I knew after seeing “Top Gun” that I wanted to be a fighter pilot — I even dressed like Maverick for Halloween once.

GA: You’re too tall to play Tom Cruise!

JS: (laughs) Well, this was a while ago. Then I got involved with the aviation program at school. I was also motivated by learning about the various mission aviation programs that exist when I was at Oshkosh, so I’ve also become interested in contributing there.

Seth Padgett: I was born in Germany, so I’ve been on aircraft since I was a child flying back and forth to visit family. I became more seriously involved through an aviation camp where we did flight planning, and from there Tim Smith turned me on to the KIAE program in Frankfort.

GA: What have been the biggest obstacles for each of you in pursuing your pilot’s licenses?

MD: I was always concerned about “what if there’s a problem during flight”? I had to tell myself to get past it and stop being afraid to try.

JS: For me, it’s the number of hoops you have to jump through, plus the financial burden. But, even though it’s a cliché, you truly can do anything you set your mind to do.

Jason Smith

Jason Smith

SP: It’s so much easier to get a driver’s license – take a test, drive an instructor around, and you’re done. Earning your pilot’s license is such a time investment; it’s easy to get discouraged. You have to remind yourself that you will get there, just be patient and stay focused!

GA: We, in the aviation industry, already know that bringing youth to aviation is vital to growing the industry. So what would you want to share with kids your age that may be interested, but intimidated, by flying?

SP: Statistically speaking, flying is very safe. When you see how many check-ups and tests you have to do to become a pilot and take care of your aircraft, you’ll see there’s nothing to be intimidated by.

MD: If you’ve never flown before, or are scared of flying, find an airport and see if anyone is willing to take you up and experience it for yourself. Learn more about airplanes and how they work — that’s how I got hooked!

JS: I agree — get up and fly! Talking about it isn’t enough!

GA: Lastly, what do you plan to do with your licenses — personal enjoyment, or career aspirations?

MD: Right now, mostly personal enjoyment. It’s still a little early for me to look beyond to career options.

JS: I mentioned earlier about being a fighter pilot and doing missionary work, which requires mechanical knowledge as well, so I’m putting focus there too.

SP: I’d like to fly for the Air Force initially. Afterward, I’ll likely transition to flying for services like UPS, FedEx, Delta — many options! But also personal enjoyment for sure!

Shortly after our conversations, all six pilots met and discussed formations, with the three boys listening intently. The students then met with the pilots of their Yaks and got personal instructions for their safety and knowledge about occupying the second seat. I marveled at the focus they all had on the task at hand as I snapped a few pictures — my presence wasn’t even registering anymore. They were now sponges, soaking in everything about the aircraft they were climbing aboard!

A few gallons of avgas were added, the Yaks (and their accompanying Cessna 172R and Christen Eagle II) taxied out and took to the air. I managed to catch a couple of passes over Bowman Field before I had to leave for another appointment, so I didn’t get to stick around to get their impressions afterward. But I think it was safe to assume that it was nothing but joy and excitement all around!

Based in Louisville, Kentucky, GlobalAir.com serves the general aviation, business aircraft, and regional airline communities by offering clients and online visitors a range of aircraft and aviation-related data and services.

Comments

  1. Dave Hill says

    Leonardo Davinci got it right when he wrote,“When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return.” Passion can’t guarantee the future but it can guarantee it will never quit looking to make a way.

  2. says

    Little mention of future competent “MANAGEMENT” guru’s – all about flying and fixing.
    But we know that aviation, ONLY aviation, is the ONE industry that believes that “passion”, NOTHING more, will some how guarantee a glamorus, but financially questionable destiny! Comments anyone?

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