Bad bounce for Cessna

Aircraft: Cessna 172. Injuries: None. Location: Westminister, Md. Aircraft damage: Substantial.

What reportedly happened: The pilot was attempting to land on the 1,840-foot runway. The plane’s airspeed was higher than recommended for a short-field landing.

The airplane touched down, bounced, and floated, touched down and bounced again. After a third touchdown the pilot initiated a go-around.

He returned to his airport of origin, and post-flight examinations revealed damage to one propeller blade and substantial damage to the engine firewall.

The pilot reported that there were no pre-accident mechanical malfunctions or anomalies with the airplane.

Probable cause: The pilot’s inadequate recovery from a bounced landing, which resulted in a loss of airplane control. Contributing to the accident was the pilot’s improper approach airspeed for a short-field landing.

NTSB Identification: ERA11CA516

This September 2011 accident report is provided by the National Transportation Safety Board. Published as an educational tool, it is intended to help pilots learn from the misfortunes of others.

Comments

  1. Vaughn S. Price says

    I forgot to mention the most important omission in pre solo training, if you are taught attitude flying instead of airspeed indicator you will always be at the correct approach speed. Fly the wing, not the airspeed indicator

  2. David Vancina says

    As a student training in a 172, I’d love to know what the approach speed was. With full flaps I have to concentrate on keeping my airspeed high enough. To fast has never been my problem.

  3. Rich says

    I am no super pilot but I can routinely land on a paved runway and with some aggressive braking be stopped at the top of the runway number markings.

    This needs to be practiced on a runway bigger than you need before you try it on a “short” runway.
    The 172 is the safest production airplane ever built but still people manage to bend them up, which should be a punishable, criminal act.

  4. Vaughn S. Price says

    a little pre”private test” in power approaches to a full stall landing would have had a profound effect on this pilots ability to handle short field landings;
    I blame his flight instructor

      • Vaughn S. Price says

        THANKS FOR THE WELCOME AGREEMENT ONLY A PILOT WITH A DEGREE OF EXPERIENCE AND TALANT WOULD UNDERSTAND THE NEED FOR THE FIRST INSTRUCTOR TO PREPARE HIS STUDENT FOR AS MANY VARIABLES AS POSSIBLE AND INSTILL IN A NEW PRIVATE PILOT THE UNDERSTANDING THA HE WAS ONLY ON THE FIRST RUNG OF THE LADDER WHICH ENABLES HIM OR HER TO STICK SOME INNOCENTS NECK OUT

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