Hearing to focus on state of American aviation

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The House Aviation Subcommittee, chaired by U.S. Rep. Frank LoBiondo (R-NJ), will examine the state of American aviation during a Congressional hearing on Thursday.

The subcommittee will hear testimony on the economic health of American aviation, including impediments to growth, as well as issues or policy areas that should be considered in the next FAA reauthorization bill.

The hearing, titled “The State of American Aviation,” is scheduled to begin at 10 a.m. on Thursday, Dec. 12, in 2167 Rayburn House Office Building.

Witnesses include:

  • Susan Kurland, Assistant Secretary for Aviation and International Affairs, Department of Transportation
  • Nicholas E. Calio, President and CEO, Airlines for America
  • Mark Brewer, Airport Director, Manchester-Boston Regional Airport; Chair, American Association of Airport Executives
  • Pete Bunce, President and CEO, General Aviation Manufacturers Association
  • Ed Bolen, President and CEO, National Business Aviation Association
  • Edward Wytkind, President, Transportation Trades Department, AFL-CIO

More information about the hearing, including testimony, additional background information, and link to a live webcast, will be posted here as it becomes available.

Comments

  1. Nice to see that did not invite AOPA or EAA, the two organisations that have more contact with front line GA pilots than all of the others combined, despite the fact that GA flies more hours per year than all the airlines.

    I think they have already decided the outcome, now they just have to get everybody to come to it.

    • Also LAMA should have been included as representative of newer light aircraft. GAMA,General Aviation Manufacturers Association, requires $2.5 million in sales to apply for membership, not exactly light sport or light GA producers. Maule, Cub Crafters, Waco Classic need not apply, they don’t have the sales numbers to be considered, and yet they are viable stable producers of GA aircraft.

  2. And who will be addressing the issues of excessive medical regulation for private pilots rather than promotion of training to retain strong pilot skills, the obvious source of accidents. Frankly, even the scheduled airline carrier pilots could use some flight training without George as the assistant. If we will not allow the pilots who must live in the GA environment to have input, we should not expect rational use of our limited resources. This hearing looks like more of the same, some legislators will feel good about doing very little.

    • Thanks Mooney for your continuing efforts on this matter of the 3rd class not adding anything of significance to safety although I don’t want to substitute apples (mandatory training) for oranges (3rd class medical). Throw the oranges out on their lack of merit and encourage (not make mandatory) the apples (additional training based on the circumstances).

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