Crosswind crimps Bellanca

Aircraft: Bellanca Super Viking. Injuries: None. Location: Branson, Mo. Aircraft damage: Substantial.

What reportedly happened: The pilot was attempting to land. At the time the wind was from the south at 8 to 10 knots with gusts to 20 knots.

As he approached for landing on runway 12, he crabbed the airplane into the wind and slipped it to touch down on the centerline.

Upon touchdown, the airplane veered to the left. He applied right rudder, but it was not sufficient to keep the airplane on the runway. The left main gear went off the side of the runway, hitting a rise in the terrain, which caused the airplane to bounce back into the air, then come down hard enough to collapse the landing gear.

Substantial damage resulted to the left wing spar. A skid mark, which veered sharply to the left side of the runway, was visible.

Probable cause: The pilot did not maintain directional control of the airplane while landing with a gusting crosswind.

NTSB Identification: CEN12CA193

This March 2012 accident report is provided by the National Transportation Safety Board. Published as an educational tool, it is intended to help pilots learn from the misfortunes of others.

Comments

  1. “…the airplane veered to the left. He applied right rudder, but it was not sufficient to keep the airplane on the runway….”

    Applied rudder to keep the airplane on the runway??????????? Really! Go ahead and put some more “foot” into it but that’s not what’s going to keep the aircraft from drifting downwind off of the runway. It’s interesting that the right-up says aircraft “veered” to the left side of the runway whereas a better term would be “drifted” to the left side of the runway; nevertheless, it’s the alereon that controls the movement around the longitudinal axis and is what was needed here and NOT the rudder. The rudder controls the movement around the vertical axis and does little good in preventing drift. Aren’t they teaching basic controls anymore?

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