Hartzell debuts Trailblazer props

Hartzell Propeller is introducing two- and three-blade versions of its new swept-tip Trailblazer prop for experimental aircraft and a number of certificated aircraft models.

The next-generation Advanced Structural Composite Hartzell Trailblazer swept-tip prop will be exhibited at Hartzell Propeller’s B-034/35 booth at the upcoming SUN ‘n FUN International Fly-In & Expo, April 1-6, and installed on a homebuilt Sportsman at Glasair Aviation’s outdoor static display MD-017B. The Expo is held at Florida’s Lakeland Linder Airport (LAL).

Hartzell“I put the new Hartzell Trailblazer prop on my Sportsman for increased performance that backcountry flying demands. Backcountry flying is all about getting into remote landing areas, but once you’re in you have to get back out,” said Hartzell Propeller President Joe Brown. “The takeoff acceleration and climb performance of the new Trailblazer prop gives me the added performance I want for backcountry flying.”

The new Hartzell Trailblazer swept-tip propellers are designed to maximize performance of the numerous aircraft, both certified and amateur built, specifically designed for bush and backcountry flying, company officials said.

The two-blade version is compatible with most Lycoming 360 and 390 series engines, with no placards or restrictions.

A three-blade version is available for higher horsepower applications. In addition, Hartzell Propeller is working with numerous aircraft manufacturers to pursue approvals to install the new Trailblazer propeller on certified aircraft, officials said.

The two-blade configuration of the Hartzell Trailblazer propeller is available in 78”, 80” and 83” diameters and the three-blade configuration in 80”, 82” and 85” diameters. All have unlimited blade life and are approximately 20% lighter than comparable propellers with aluminum blades, according to company officials.

The Hartzell Trailblazer’s all carbon fiber construction features a mesh erosion shield and field replaceable nickel-cobalt leading edge, ensuring it can withstand demanding backcountry and bush flying, according to company officials. The carbon fiber structural composite construction is more than five to 10 times stronger than beech wood and spruce, respectively, and includes Hartzell’s state-of-art wedge shank blade retention design, officials add.

For more information: HartzellProp.com.

About General Aviation News Staff

Speak Your Mind

*