GA looks to debt ceiling date

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Oct.. 17 is rapidly approaching and even the experts with crystal balls can’t predict what the government will do. Unless Congress moves before then and passes some sort of funding bills, general aviation could suffer more than the few problems the partial government shutdown is now causing.

Day-to-day flying under the current furloughing of only about 17% of the government workforce is not badly adversely affecting GA. [Read more...]

Talk of privatizing ATC reappears

WASHINGTON, D.C — A wise person once commented that we learn from history that we learn nothing from history.

Nothing could be more accurate than the current flap over privatizing the air traffic control system.

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Exporting GA

WASHINGTON, D.C. — General aviation might be sluggish in the United States during these economic slow periods, but in the Asia-Pacific area, GA flying is getting a lot of attention — but not always for the most positive reasons.

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Pilots have new appeal rules

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Pilots appealing to the National Transportation Safety Board about certificate enforcement will have new rules under which to conduct their efforts as the NTSB announced on Friday, Sept, 20, a final rule to implement several changes in their procedures.

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NextGen moves closer to reality

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Next Generation Air Transportation System — known as NextGen — moved two steps closer to reality in late August when new programs became operational.

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Congress returns to busy schedule

After its August vacation, Congress returns to Capitol Hill Sept. 9 with a full plate of issues, some of which will directly affect general aviation. As usual in Washington, money is on top of the plate.

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Taking the reins at AOPA

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association has a new president: Mark Baker. Rumors of the appointment were rampant at EAA AirVenture in Oshkosh, but the official announcement wasn’t made until Aug. 20.

Baker is only the fifth person to be president of AOPA. Actually, he is the sixth. The first was T. Townsend Ludgington, a member of the board who founded AOPA but who quickly resigned the post when the first employee was hired.

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Proposed AD could have devastating effect on GA

WASHINGTON, D.C. — From the 1940s to the 1970s, Max Karant was a senior vice president of the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association (AOPA) who tirelessly and fearlessly fought for the interests of GA. Even though he frequently was blunt and sometimes vicious in his discussions with — and about — the FAA, most people respected him. In fact, on one occasion, an FAA official told me, “we weren’t always right, but he made us be right.”

On one of the lighter occasions, Max asked an FAA official how he got ideas for proposing and writing regulations. “Well,” replied the official, “I’m sitting in my office and I hear a booming voice say ‘write a rule.’ I say ‘yes sir, good or bad? And the voice replies ‘BAD.’”

That friendly exchange was good for a few moments of laughter, but the latest proposal from the FAA might have more serious consequences. That booming voice undoubtedly said BAD.

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Small airplane revitalization act passes Senate committee

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Senate Commerce Committee’s voice vote passage Tuesday, July 30, of the Small Airplane Revitalization Act moved the bill closer to passage by the full Congress, requiring the FAA to put into effect changes to Part 23 that would make available less expensive and more practical products for general aviation airplanes.

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FAA makes certification rule change proposals public

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The FAA has released to the public the 335-page report of the Aviation Rule Making Committee set up to recommend broad changes in the certification of general aviation aircraft in an effort to increase the safety of GA and reduce the costs of producing planes and parts.

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