Evektor wins EASA Type Certificate

43SportStarRTC

The rush is on in Europe, at least for the best-prepared of LSA producers. EASA, the European Aviation Safety Agency, has accepted ASTM standards as a means of certifying light aircraft in the European Union, but put its own stamp on this approval. Those wishing to sell an ASTM-compliant SLSA in Europe have some extra hoops to jump through. The letters DOA, POA, and RTC apply, being, in order, Design Organization Approval, Production Organization Approval, and Restricted Type Certificate.

If you think that sounds a little like Part 23 requirements (read: expensive), you’re right. Yet if a LSA producer wants to sell essentially the same airplane in the USA and the EU, it has to get all the approvals. Recently, a third company achieved this, following Czech Sport Aircraft and Flight Design.

[Read more…]

Flying the Bristell

Bristell

Since the Sebring LSA Expo in January, the airshow season has rushed by at warp speed and now we can return to more aircraft flown at the event that kicks off the aviation year. In this post, we’ll have a quick look at the all-new Bristell, first unveiled to the American pilot community at the AOPA Aviation Summit last fall in Hartford, Connecticut.

If you feel a sense of deja vu when looking at Bristell, that’s understandable. It has some common design heritage with the SportCruiser or PiperSport because the man behind the BRM Aero Bristell — Milan Bristela — was once affiliated with Czech Aircraft Works which originated the design.

[Read more…]

Pipistrel finalizes a new LSA trainer

AlphaTrainer

Engineers at Pipistrel must not sleep in too often. This company, which won the NASA efficiency challenge several times — in 2011 taking home a $1.35 million cash prize — just unveiled a full-size version of a sleek four-seat design called the Panthera. Now on the other end of the spectrum comes its Alpha Trainer, a reasonably priced LSA model aimed at the flight instruction market.

[Read more…]

FAA forecast: Spot on or improbable?

As the Light-Sport Aircraft industry ramps up for a summer of flying and the season’s biggest celebration of flight, AirVenture Oshkosh, I am still analyzing the FAA’s recently issued 20-year forecast for aviation, which shows growth prospects for LSAs, while predicting a decline in the total number of piston-powered aircraft. Viewed from a distance, this might seem beneficial to LSA producers and sellers.

Regretfully, I find FAA’s forecast improbable. Not that the agency’s number crunchers are wrong — in fact, I hope they might be right. I simply find a 20-year forecast for an industry only seven years old to be a form of spreadsheet-based palm reading.

That said, here are a few tidbits gleaned from a study of FAA’s spreadsheets: [Read more…]

LSAs vs. Cessna 150s

Skycatcher

There’s been a lot of debate in the aviation community over the value and challenges of LSA as flight trainers compared to old standards like Cessna 150s. I’d like to weigh in on some the questions being raised.

Are LSA harder to fly — specifically, are they harder to land? The best way to respond is to say that they are different. [Read more…]

Welcome to Sling

Sling

Have you been thinking that it’s been some time since a new Special LSA was announced? While the torrid pace of yesteryear has abated, it ain’t over by a long shot. I know of at least a dozen aircraft still in progress to achieve SLSA status. Now, welcome to Sling, SLSA #125.

[Read more…]

Aerotrek success mirrors other positive news

Aerotrek

Aerotrek may be one of those “sleepers.” You know, the kind of company that does well, has few problems, and doesn’t need to make a lot of noise to be successful. Aerotrek’s tri-gear and taildragger models look great, fly well, and are priced so reasonably that sales are remarkably steady. The company ranks #12 in fleet size and came in fifth for 2011 registrations.

[Read more…]

Kodak moment for Quicksilver

QuicksilverGT500

Among all aircraft producers in the world, a very limited number have exceeded the daunting barrier of delivering more than 10,000 airplanes. Those in this exclusive club include manufacturers of major aircraft such as Boeing, Cessna, Piper, and precious few others. While Van’s Aircraft is approaching this number with its RV kit-built aircraft series (itself a rather incredible achievement), no recreational aircraft company has passed the 10,000 unit mark…except one: Quicksilver.

[Read more…]