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Flying on wings of Mercury

Posted on April 25th, 2012 by

Though Hammondsport, N.Y., is synonymous with the name Glenn Curtiss and well known as the home of the Curtiss Aeroplane Co., after World War I Hammondsport also became the home of another aircraft manufacturer — Aerial Service Corp. Continue Reading →

Front page news

Posted on February 15th, 2012 by

LINDBERGH DOES IT! TO PARIS IN 33-1/3 HOURS cried out the newspaper headlines on May 22, 1927. Lindbergh’s epic flight made front page headlines in papers all around the world. We are all aware of the impact Lindbergh’s New York-to-Paris... Continue Reading →

The crazy man of the air: C.K. Hamilton wows crowds in 1910

Posted on January 29th, 2012 by

Aviation burst upon the American public in 1910 through a frenzy of air meets, contests, daring flights and maneuvers. Over the year, 100 regularly organized meets and exhibitions were held. New records were set and broken almost every week. During... Continue Reading →

The first regulations

Posted on October 23rd, 2011 by

Those who are familiar with today’s Federal Aviation Regulations know that they are a thicket of rules, occupying four volumes of the Code of Federal Regulations, consisting of 460 sections extending over 3,600 pages. But 85 years ago, it was... Continue Reading →

The OX-5 racers

Posted on September 18th, 2011 by

In a previous column, I discussed the penetration of the ubiquitous, war-surplus Curtiss OX-5 engine into the new aircraft market, which lasted into the 1930s. Not only was the OX-5 engine used as a powerplant option on new aircraft, it... Continue Reading →

California’s air heritage

Posted on June 19th, 2011 by

Dennis Parks is Curator Emeritus of Seattle’s Museum of Flight. Aviation was introduced to California — and Californians were introduced to aviation — via a spectacular 11-day event held at Dominguez Ranch outside of Los Angeles in January 1910. Continue Reading →

Fliers or liars?

Posted on May 9th, 2011 by

Dennis Parks is Curator Emeritus of Seattle’s Museum of Flight. When Wilbur Wright arrived in France May 29, 1908, to carry out demonstrations for a French syndicate interested in building Wright Flyers, it would be the first time one of... Continue Reading →

The flying bicycle

Posted on April 13th, 2011 by

Dennis Parks is Curator Emeritus of Seattle’s Museum of Flight. Before they pioneered the airplane, inventors such as Orville and Wilbur Wright and Glenn Curtiss had another technical fascination: Bicycles. Continue Reading →

Flying Gypsies

Posted on March 1st, 2011 by

Dennis Parks is Curator Emeritus of Seattle’s Museum of Flight. Ever since the conception of the light airplane in the 1920s, the magnitude of flights achieved by pilots using light planes never ceases to surprise, especially when used for around-the-word... Continue Reading →

The first sport planes

Posted on February 14th, 2011 by

Dennis Parks is Curator Emeritus of Seattle’s Museum of Flight. In the May 13, 1920, issue of the English magazine Flight, a survey of a new type of aircraft they called the “sporting aeroplane” was published. The article provided a... Continue Reading →