CROSSFIELD’S DAUGHTER EXPRESSES GRATITUTDE

To Tom Norton: I am Sally, Scott’s daughter, child number five of six. Now that I am done crying, may I say how very grateful I am to you for writing that article (“NTSB: Lack of weather update killed Crossfield; Final report cites ATC failure to advise, Crossfield failure to ask,” Oct. 19, 2007 issue). I will never in my life, I think, be able to find the words to express how that NTSB report makes me feel. Either you’ve obtained their actual documentation, as I have, or you are much more intuitive and intelligent than the average Joe (I, of course, do not include Dad’s fabulous circle of friends in this group). You’ve also probably read some of the horrid stuff that’s come out about Dad since that “report.”

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BAD ADVICE?

I believe Paul McBride may have given some bad advice regarding not pulling the prop through on engines that are not being used regularly (“Ask Paul: Prepare your plane for winter,” Nov. 9 issue). Unless Teledyne Continental Motors changed its policy recently, it “requires” the prop be pulled through every seven days or the warranty is void. Lycoming may have a different policy.

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HELP!

Can someone please help? I know of a crashed American DC-3 in the jungles of New Guinea and wish to know where we might find the plate with the manufacturer’s details and the aircraft serial number.

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STILL NO. 1

In Letters to the Editor of your Oct. 19 issue, Lou Drendal commented on Meg Godlewski’s article about the 35-ship formation at Oshkosh in your Aug. 24 issue (“The largest OSH formation?”). He suggested that I was “not even close to correct” when I said it “was the largest formation ever at Oshkosh.” He cited several larger formations of T-34 and T-6 aircraft. He even included a picture of the 1999 T-34 61-ship formation.

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MORE ON OSH FORMATIONS

Regarding the highest number of airplanes flown into Oshkosh, read “The Cessna 120/140 Story Book” by Dorchen Forman for a number never to be duplicated by one kind of civilian plane: 163 Cessna 120s, 140s and 140As flew in a trail into Oshkosh. All one kind of plane, within 15 horsepower of each other — and they did it safely.

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FLYING A 1911 WRIGHT ‘B’ FLYER

I just want to share an experience I had in September of this year. I traveled to Dayton, Ohio, to see a replica of the 1911 Wright “B” Flyer aircraft and the museum that is at the Dayton Wright Bros. Airport. I understood that under certain conditions there was a chance of flying in the Wright Flyer, and that made the 900-mile trip worth it.

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