Expedition Amelia seeks funding to finally solve Earhart mystery

earhart

On May 21, 1937, Amelia Earhart and her navigator Fred Noonan boarded their Lockheed Electra and took off from Oakland, California, on their second attempt to fly around the world. This time, they flew to the east.

Earhart was supposed to have landed on Howland Island, a coral island some 1,700 miles from Honolulu for refueling, but she never arrived.  The United States Navy searched for 17 days, but no trace of Earhart was found — and people still haven’t stopped looking.

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New evidence, new expedition and new hope in search for Amelia Earhart

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On Wednesday, March 12, Ric Gillespie, executive director of The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR), showed aircraft debris that washed up on Nikumaroro, an uninhabited South Pacific atoll where Amelia Earhart and navigator Fred Noonan are believed to have landed and ultimately perished as castaways. The debris is the subject of new materi­als analysis that may result in conclusive proof that the wreckage came from Amelia Earhart’s aircraft.

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Bids fly for Amelia Earhart’s gloves

Signed flying gloves reportedly worn by Amelia Earhart during a historic flight have been found on eBay, according to a post at WhatSellsBest.com. According to the sellers listing, the historic signed leather gloves were worn by Earhart during her 1935 “Goodwill Solo Flight” to Mexico. The seller states the auction also includes documentation supporting the items provenance and history. (For close-up photos of the gloves and included documentation see eBay listing #320871848279)