Fuel starvation brings down Mooney

The Mooney M20K’s engine lost power in flight, and the pilot made a forced landing to a field near Hudson, Colo. The pilot was seriously injured.

During the post-accident examination, one pint of fuel was recovered from the right wing fuel tank, and 7.5 gallons of fuel were recovered from the left wing fuel tank. The fuel selector valve was found in the right fuel tank position. No fuel was found in the lines to the engine.

The NTSB determined the probable cause of the accident as the pilot’s improper fuel management, which resulted in the loss of engine power due to fuel starvation.

NTSB Identification: CEN13LA388

This June 2013 accident report is provided by the National Transportation Safety Board. Published as an educational tool, it is intended to help pilots learn from the misfortunes of others.

Baron hits runway light on go-around

The pilot of the Beechcraft Baron was attempting to land at an airport in St. Paul, Minn. After touching down, he realized he had landed long, and was concerned about being able to bring the plane to a stop before he ran out of runway, so he initiated a go-around.

During climb-out, the pilot heard a “thump,” so he returned to the airport and landed the airplane. [Read more…]

RV balloons on landing

The pilot, accompanied by a passenger, was attempting to land the RV-7A at an airport in Altoona, Pa. He maintained 80 mph on final approach and slowed to 70 mph at touchdown.

Upon touchdown on the main landing gear, a wind gust occurred, and the airplane ballooned, then came down hard on the nose landing gear, which collapsed. [Read more…]

Failure to obey AD leads to mismanagement of fuel

The owner of the airplane was a commercial pilot, however according to the flight instructor he flew with, he had a medical condition for which his insurance carrier required him to fly with a CFI.

During the preflight inspection, the pilot/owner of the Beech Musketeer observed about 20 gallons of fuel in the left main fuel tank and significantly less fuel in the right main fuel tank. The instructor did not witness the pre-flight inspection of the aircraft. [Read more…]