UAV Navigation to sponsor Reno racer

UAV Navigation, a vendor of flight control avionics and motion processing solutions, will sponsor a plane in Reno’s National Championship Air Races and Air Show in September. Guillermo Parodi, UAV Navigation’s CEO and co-founder, will fly the aircraft as a pilot. His plane, nº36, dubbed “N-A-RUSH”, is a Cassutt Special III, a single-seat racing jet designed in the United States in 1951 by ex-TWA captain Tom Cassutt.

Guillermo commented, “I appreciate the first-hand experience of flight-testing the company’s avionics equipment myself. It is a direct way of understanding the needs of the ultimate consumer and a fertile ground for breeding new ideas.”

UAV Navigation has supplied the telemetry used in the Red Bull air shows and the camera stabilization for Moto GP. These extreme environments provide a highly visible and challenging training ground for the company’s equipment, company officials said, noting prototypes and ideas can be tested in a real and demanding environment and later translated into final products in general aviation, unmanned systems and UAV Navigation’s core markets.

The Reno National Championship Air Races is the last pylon-racing event in the world. With seven classes of aircraft racing around the unique course, anywhere from 50 to 500 feet above the ground flying wing-tip to wing-tip at speeds exceeding 500 miles per hour, it is truly an event not to be missed. The plane that UAV sponsors participates in the Formula One Class. Formula One aircraft are all powered by a Continental O-200 engine. The fastest Formula One aircraft reach almost 250 mph on the 3.12-mile race course in Reno.

Founded in 2004, UAV Navigation is a privately owned company that specializes in the design of flight control systems and motion processors and has offices in Spain, US and Israel.

For more information: UAVNavigation.org

 

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Comments

  1. Why did they call it a “racing jet?”

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