Review: Non-Stop: A Turbulent History of Northwest Airlines

Many of General Aviation News readers have a connection with the airline industry. Many not directly connected to the airline industry follow it all the same. Stop by any number of plane-spotter websites to see the copious number of beautiful images taken by those transfixed by airline-class aircraft.

If you count yourself among the number of airline followers, you may consider a new book titled, “Non-Stop: A Turbulent History of Northwest Airlines.” Written by Jack El-Hai, the book traces the roots of Northwest Airlines from its founder, Lewis Brittin, to its 2010 merger with Delta.

Non-Stop

“Non-Stop” delves into what it is like to fly a crippled airliner, to be among the first “stewardesses” and to ride in the cabin of  a luxurious Stratocruiser for the first time. Also included are war-time contributions, as well as D.B. Cooper’s storied parachute getaway in 1971 in the Pacific Northwest.

Accidents, smoking regulations, labor relations, airline food and much more are all laid bare.

The 328-page book will include more than 250 pictures and be available in November 2013.

Comments

  1. Richard Baker says:

    Remember when it was called Northwest Orient. My family flew them out of Detroit long ago.

  2. Look forward to the read.

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