Giles elected chairman of Greenville Airport Commission

photo (16)Jonathan P. Giles (pictured) has been elected chairman of the Greenville Airport Commission (GAC), owner and operator of the Greenville Downtown Airport (GMU) in South Carolina, while Jim Wall has been elected vice chairman of the commission.

GMU is the busiest general aviation airport in South Carolina and is a self-sufficient entity with financial strength that doesn’t rely on local taxpayers for funding. GMU is home to Greenville Jet Center, the largest FBO in the state., as well as more than 25 other aviation-related businesses creating 453 jobs that annually contribute more than $35.2 million to the local economy.

AirVenture gets bigger and so does Sporty’s

Sporty’s will unveil a new display tent at this year’s EAA AirVenture in Oshkosh, slated for July 28-Aug. 3.

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FlightSafety promotes Bitgood to manager of Long Beach center

FlightSafety International has promoted Todd Bitgood to manager of its Learning Center in Long Beach, California. He succeeds Pete Nily, who has become a Regional Director of Training Operations.

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VFR into IMC proves fatal

Aircraft: RV-4. Injuries: 1 Fatal. Location: Cedartown, Ga. Aircraft damage: Destroyed.

What reportedly happened: The pilot, who did not have an instrument rating, took off in VFR conditions on a cross-country flight. There was no record of the pilot obtaining a preflight briefing.

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FAA receives unleaded fuels proposals

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The FAA reports it has received 10 replacement fuel proposals from producers Afton Chemical Company, Avgas LLC, Shell, Swift Fuels and a consortium of BP, TOTAL and Hjelmco, for further evaluation in the Piston Aviation Fuels Initiative (PAFI), an industry-government initiative designed to help the general aviation industry transition to an unleaded aviation gasoline.

The FAA will now assess the viability of the candidate fuels to determine which fuels may be part of the first phase of laboratory testing at the FAA’s William J. Hughes Technical Center. The goal is for government and industry to work together to have a new unleaded fuel by 2018, according to FAA officials.

“We’re committed to getting harmful lead out of general aviation fuel,” said Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx. “This work will benefit the environment and provide a safe and available fuel for our general aviation community.”

There are approximately 167,000 general aviation aircraft in the United States that rely on 100LL aviation gasoline for safe operation. It is the only remaining transportation fuel in the United States that contains the addition of lead, a toxic substance, to create the very high octane levels needed for high-performance aircraft.

PAFI was established to facilitate the development and deployment of a new unleaded aviation gasoline with the least impact on the existing piston-engine aircraft fleet. PAFI will play a key role in the testing and deployment of an unleaded fuel across the existing general aviation fleet, FAA officials note.

Congress authorized $6 million for the fiscal year 2014 budget to support the PAFI test program at the FAA Technical Center.

“The FAA, the general aviation community and the Environmental Protection Agency are focused on this issue, and we look forward to collaborating with fuel producers to make an unleaded aviation gasoline available for the general aviation fleet,” said FAA Administrator Michael Huerta.

On June 10, 2013, the FAA asked fuel producers to submit proposals for replacement fuels by July 1, 2014. The goal is to identify, select, and provide fleetwide certification for fuels determined to have the lowest impact on the general aviation fleet.

The FAA will analyze the candidate fuels in terms of their impact on the existing fleet, the production and distribution infrastructure, their impact on the environment, their toxicology and the cost of aircraft operations.

By Sept. 1, 2014, the FAA will select several of the fuels for phase-one laboratory and rig testing. Based on the results of the phase one testing, the FAA anticipates that two or three fuels will be selected for phase-two engine and aircraft testing. That testing will generate standardized qualification and certification data for candidate fuels, along with property and performance data.

For more information:  FAA.gov 

SkyCraft finishes ASTM compliance, opens new factory

SkyCraft Airplanes has declared to the FAA that its SD-1 Minsiport is compliant with all ASTM regulations for Light-Sport Aircraft one year after publicly announcing it would be producing the airplane ready-to-fly.

SkyCraft now awaits an FAA audit, after which it will be able to make its first aircraft deliveries.  The FAA has scheduled SkyCraft’s audit for two months from now, company officials report.

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Airshow star Michael Goulian to serve as AOPA ambassador

Legendary air show and racing pilot Michael Goulian will serve as an AOPA Ambassador, according to officials with the Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association.

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New flight school opens at SNA

It has been more than 34 years since a helicopter flight school has opened its doors at John Wayne Airport in Orange County, Calif. In fact Revolution Aviation is the first flight school locally to offer crossover training in helicopter, plane and UAV equipment, according to company officials.

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West Star Aviation named East Alton Rotary Business of the Year

The Rotary Club of East Alton, Ill., recently recognized West Star Aviation as its Business of the Year.

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New features unveiled for Flying Eyes Sunglasses

AUSTIN, Texas — Patented Flying Eyes Sunglasses  are being updated with an even thinner set of temples to make them easier to wear under a headset.

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