Last flight of a seaplane legend

SRB 1

Pulling up to his ramp in back of a Piper two summers ago, the front-seater asked if the energetic kid who had raced up to pull the floats onto the slippery wood could be trusted around the prop. That “kid” was 92-year-old Bill Brooks, looking and acting youthful as a seaplaner.

I convinced the pilot his seaplane was in good hands. Although Bill’s trouble in renewing his medical certificate forced him from the cockpit of his Beaver and Cessna 206 in his early 90s, he still showed up for work everyday with his faithful dock-dog at his side. [Read more…]

BoldMethod: The life of a 20-year-old banner tow pilot

Haley Howard is a CFI and banner pilot from Gulf Shores, Alabama. At only 20 years old, she’s already well on her way with 1,350 hours of flight time… not to mention her CSEL (Commercial – Single Engine Land), CSES (Commercial – Single Engine Seaplane), Tailwheel Endorsement, CFI-A (Certified Flight Instructor), and Instrument Rating,” reports BoldMethod‘s Swayne Martin. “Today, Haley spends much of her time flying banners in an American Champion Scout, owned and operated by the Shrimp Basket, a Gulf-State chain of seafood restaurants.” Read more about Haley’s life as a banner tow pilot at the BoldMethod website and an expanded first-person view via Martin’s “Share Your Story” feature on his website.

How one of our readers makes her living in GA

bk1

One of our regular regulars, Brittany Kerr, responded immediately to our call for readers who make their living in general aviation:

“As soon as I got to the airport this morning, I started my day off by reading today’s The Pulse of Aviation from General Aviation News (which has become my daily routine). When I read this, I knew immediately I had to respond!

Since 2010, I have made my living through general aviation in the middle of rural South Dakota.

[Read more…]

Making a living as an ag pilot

G164 Super B Ag Cat Seeding Rice in Northern California

By TRACY T. THURMAN

An ag pilot’s day starts early, just as the sun lifts itself above the horizon. It’s cool in the morning. The air is clean and crisp. Standing on a dew sparkled grass runway watching the landscape emerge into the light of a new day is part of an ag pilot’s daily commute.

The morning calm however, is soon broken by a demanding shout. “Clear!” The ‘tick tick tick tick… whirrrr…’ of a turboprop engine coming to life shatters the serenity and the work day has begun.

All across the country, on air strips in rural valleys and farmlands, the same procedure is repeated. There are millions of acres that need to be planted, treated, and protected. Before most people have had their first cup of coffee, the men and women of agricultural aviation are in motion doing just that.

[Read more…]