Failure to abort takeoff kills pilot

The 16,900-hour ATP, 69, who was type rated in a Sikorsky SK-76 helicopter, Beech BE-300 and Fairchild Swearingen SA-227 airplanes, was flying a Cricket MC12, a twin-engine experimental design, that was estimated to be at least 30 pounds above the design gross weight of 375 pounds, but 15 pounds under the builder-designated gross weight at the time of the accident.

Because the airplane was an experimental amateur built airplane, the builder can waiver from the design criteria, including gross weight. According to FAA records, the pilot purchased the plane on Dec. 6, 2002. No maintenance records were located. [Read more…]

Fuel starvation brings down Mooney

The Mooney M20K’s engine lost power in flight, and the pilot made a forced landing to a field near Hudson, Colo. The pilot was seriously injured.

During the post-accident examination, one pint of fuel was recovered from the right wing fuel tank, and 7.5 gallons of fuel were recovered from the left wing fuel tank. The fuel selector valve was found in the right fuel tank position. No fuel was found in the lines to the engine.

The NTSB determined the probable cause of the accident as the pilot’s improper fuel management, which resulted in the loss of engine power due to fuel starvation.

NTSB Identification: CEN13LA388

This June 2013 accident report is provided by the National Transportation Safety Board. Published as an educational tool, it is intended to help pilots learn from the misfortunes of others.

Baron hits runway light on go-around

The pilot of the Beechcraft Baron was attempting to land at an airport in St. Paul, Minn. After touching down, he realized he had landed long, and was concerned about being able to bring the plane to a stop before he ran out of runway, so he initiated a go-around.

During climb-out, the pilot heard a “thump,” so he returned to the airport and landed the airplane. [Read more…]

NTSB slates safety seminar on accidents during flight training

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Did you know that an aspiring pilot is less likely to have an accident while training than after earning a pilot certificate? Nevertheless, officials with the National Transportation Safety Board say they’ve developed an understanding of when and how training accidents are likely to occur, both through its own investigations and through industry and government research identifying risks involved in both solo and dual instructional flights.

That’s why officials are presenting a seminar highlighting the lessons learned from NTSB’s accident investigations involving instructional accidents. The goal of the July 11 seminar is to give the GA community the tools to decrease the rate of training-related accidents, NTSB officials said. [Read more…]

RV balloons on landing

The pilot, accompanied by a passenger, was attempting to land the RV-7A at an airport in Altoona, Pa. He maintained 80 mph on final approach and slowed to 70 mph at touchdown.

Upon touchdown on the main landing gear, a wind gust occurred, and the airplane ballooned, then came down hard on the nose landing gear, which collapsed. [Read more…]