Three join EAA board of directors

Three directors have been added to the Experimental Aircraft Association board, which governs the 176,000-member aviation organization. The three new directors — Jack Pelton, Stuart Auerbach and Darren Pleasance — bring extensive aviation and business background to the board, in addition to longtime EAA involvement and thousands of hours of flight time, EAA officials said.

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NTSB completes data collection on experimental accidents

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Throughout 2011, the National Transportation Safety Board conducted a study of Experimental Amateur-Built (E-AB) aircraft to evaluate the safety of this growing and innovative segment of general aviation. In addition to using the information gathered during its accident investigations, the NTSB has been working with the FAA, the Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA), and individual owners and builders to evaluate a range of issues unique to this popular segment of general aviation.

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Street at Edwards AFB renamed to honor Scott Crossfield

From now on, anyone heading to the golf course at Edwards Air Force Base in California will take Crossfield Drive to the clubhouse, as the former Crest Drive was renamed for the legendary aviator and test pilot, Scott Crossfield, at a special ceremony Wednesday, Jan. 17, according to a report at EAA.org. Crossfield became the first man to exceed Mach 2 — in the D-558-II Skyrocket — on Nov. 20, 1953. He also was unofficially the first to fly past Mach 3. Read the full story here.

EAA restructures

One of general aviation’s oldest alphabet groups, the Experimental Aircraft Association, has reshaped its organization to “to better fulfill its mission to grow participation in aviation.”

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New ruling could harm electric aircraft growth

The Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA) and the Electric Aircraft Development Alliance (EADA) are opposing a proposed Department of State rule that would place strict restrictions on the types of lithium-ion batteries that would be available on the commercial marketplace. EAA submitted comments to the State Department explaining that such limits could greatly hamper the further development of electric aircraft that has emerged in recent years, according to a report at EAA.org